Wednesday, 9 December 2009

Reclaim The Night Men’s demo 2009

An assorted bunch of 6 other men and I gathered in the rain on Saturday 21st November to show our support for the annual Reclaim the Night March. We came from South London, Yorkshire and Cambridge. We stood around the Edith Cavell memorial statue with banners saying (something like) “Real men respect their partners” and “Real men are not violent towards women”. We handed out soggy leaflets to passers by explaining what the Reclaim the Night march is all about and telling an interested minority of them about why we were having the demo. We had a good time in spite of the rain and were cheered on by the hundreds of marchers as they went past us up the hill. We then headed to the rally venue to get a bit drier and warmer.

The demonstration was organised by the London Profeminist Men’s Group and the White Ribbon Campaign and was designed to show solidarity with the women marching and to show that it’s not only women who care about ending male violence towards women. Men are not welcome on the march itself as it is about women reclaiming the streets for themselves at night without fear and without male “protection”. The London Profeminist Men’s Group agrees that this is an important political statement to make and have tried to support the event in various respectful ways since we began meeting in November 07. This has included setting up stalls and preparing the venue for the rally after the march, having a stall at the rally and holding demonstrations in support of the march. We hope to continue to support this event into the future.

Jon

1 comment:

  1. i'm really interested in the real man idea the idea that we can recognise our masculinity but identify it in a positive way and one that is accessible and desirable to men/boys who otherwise have an increasingly limited model to follow and one which is also unattainable almost a caricature- i work with mostly young men who are either victims of and or perpetrators and aspirants to the culture of male violence as the means to an identity

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